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Tagged with 'Infection Control'

Does Hand Sanitizer Kill Viruses? What Else is it Effective Against?

Does Hand Sanitizer Kill Viruses? What Else is it Effective Against?

Is hand sanitiser effective? The question is on everyone’s minds while we each do our part to overcome Covid-19. When asking ‘does hand sanitiser work?’ the answer depends on what you’re trying to achieve. For many people, the primary objective of using hand gel is to prevent cross-contamination of the Covid-19 virus. The truth is that hand sanitiser is highly effective at killing bacteria, fungi, and other viruses too.

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How to Use a Non-Contact Infrared Thermometer

How to Use a Non-Contact Infrared Thermometer

Non-contact thermometers have become an essential component of an infection control plan for many businesses. But lack of knowledge about how to use an infrared thermometer with a laser pointer correctly could mean you’re recording temperatures wrong, making your efforts futile.

Follow this guide, or show it to your staff, for how to use a non-contact forehead thermometer correctly.

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How do Infrared Thermometers Work?

How do Infrared Thermometers Work?

To people who haven’t seen them before, infrared thermometers might look like something straight out of an episode of Dr Who. It’s no wonder some people are hesitant about the safety of using an IR thermometer. But infrared thermometers are far more hygienic than oral, axillary and rectal thermometers, and tend to be more accurate too, provided you use a CE Certified unit.

We’ll go through how infrared thermometers work in this article.

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Common Infrared Thermometer Uses

Common Infrared Thermometer Uses

The infrared thermometer has all but replaced the probe and strip thermometers as a significantly more hygienic, accurate, and adaptable alternative. Sometimes called a laser thermometer or contactless thermometer, an infrared (IR) thermometer scans sections of an object with a laser to determine its ambient temperature.

The fact that infrared thermometers do not require any physical contact makes them handy for busy doctors and nurses. There is no need to sterilise between uses or use disposable probe covers. The usability of contactless thermometers is also helpful when trying to take temperature readings in hard to reach areas. So, many engineers and catering professionals use laser thermometers to measure the temperature of equipment and produce.

So, what is an infrared thermometer used for in different industries? In this article, we’ll cover the most common uses for infrared thermometers.

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Are Infrared Thermometers Safe?

Are Infrared Thermometers Safe?

Following the surge in contactless thermometer use, some people have taken to social media to state their belief that infrared thermometers can be harmful to the people they are pointed at. One video post on Facebook depicts a conversation between a mother and dental receptionist where the mother raises concerns about what the laser thermometer will do to her children, in particular, the pineal glands in their brains.

In fact, there’s nothing dangerous about using an infrared (IR) thermometer at all, as debunked by Full Fact. We’ll explain why infrared thermometers aren’t dangerous in this article.

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A Guide to Disposable Face Mask Use

A Guide to Disposable Face Mask Use

In 2021, we’ve become accustomed to checking our bags for our face masks or grabbing one before leaving the house in the morning, and with good reason. Face masks have been scientifically proven to stem the spread of Covid-19 by reducing the number of infectious moisture droplets transmitted between people through coughing, sneezing, talking, and exhaling. 

In a study published by Scientific Reports, participants wearing a surgical mask or KN95 mask were found to emit 60% fewer airborne particles than those who didn’t wear one. Wearing a mask is proven to reduce particle transmission, but in order to achieve the most effective protection, different types of masks are required in different situations. 

In this article, we’ll explain what different types of masks are used for, and what harmful materials masks can protect against.

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Hand Sanitiser: FAQs on Safety and Uses

Hand Sanitiser: FAQs on Safety and Uses

Hand sanitiser is classed as a biocide by The Health and Safety Executive. According to The HSE, “Biocidal products are used to protect people and animals, preserve goods, stop pests like insects or rodents and control viruses, bacteria and fungi through a chemical or biological action.”

While biocides are highly regulated to make sure they are safe for use, there are still risks associated with misuse, so it’s important to know what you should and shouldn’t do with hand sanitiser.

Find answers to questions about hand sanitiser safety and what it can and can’t be used for here.

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A Guide to Veterinary Cleaning Products

A Guide to Veterinary Cleaning Products

Cleaning protocols in a veterinary practice must be strictly followed by all members of staff in order to break the cycle of infection and neutralise the possibility of cross-contamination in all areas of the practice.

The RCVS Code of Professional Conduct for Veterinary Surgeons states that “Veterinary surgeons must maintain minimum practice standards equivalent to the Core Standards of the RCVS Practice Standards Scheme.” If your practice has to undergo an assessment you need to be able to show that adequate disinfecting protocols are in place.

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How to Dispose of Biohazard Waste Bags?

How to Dispose of Biohazard Waste Bags

Biohazard waste consists of body fluids like urine and blood, along with any tools, equipment or materials that have been contaminated with body fluids, like needles. Biohazard waste can’t be disposed of in the General Waste due to the potential of coming into contact with people or animals that could be infected or get ill.

It is vital that biohazardous waste is disposed of responsibly. We use bright yellow and orange coloured waste bags to help waste disposal staff quickly identify hazardous clinical waste. Here’s what to do with a biohazard bag of waste.

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